README.md

fracture

License:
MIT R build
status Dependencies

Convert decimals to fractions in R

Installation

You can install the released version of fracture from CRAN with:

install.packages("fracture")

or the development version from GitHub with:

# install.packages("remotes")
remotes::install_github("rossellhayes/fracture")

Usage

Convert decimals to a character vector of fractions

fracture converts decimals into fractions.

fracture(0.5)
#> [1] 1/2

fracture((1:11) / 12)
#>  [1] 1/12  1/6   1/4   1/3   5/12  1/2   7/12  2/3   3/4   5/6   11/12

Additional arguments help you get exactly the result you expect:

Common denominators

fracture((1:11) / 12, common_denom = TRUE)
#>  [1] 1/12  2/12  3/12  4/12  5/12  6/12  7/12  8/12  9/12  10/12 11/12

Base-10 denominators

fracture(1 / (2:12), base_10 = TRUE)
#>  [1] 5/10             3333333/10000000 25/100           2/10            
#>  [5] 1666667/10000000 1428571/10000000 125/1000         1111111/10000000
#>  [9] 1/10             909091/10000000  833333/10000000

Maximum denominators

fracture(1 / (2:12), base_10 = TRUE, max_denom = 1000)
#>  [1] 5/10     333/1000 25/100   2/10     167/1000 143/1000 125/1000 111/1000
#>  [9] 1/10     91/1000  83/1000

fracture(1 / (2:12), base_10 = TRUE, common_denom = TRUE, max_denom = 1000)
#>  [1] 500/1000 333/1000 250/1000 200/1000 167/1000 143/1000 125/1000 111/1000
#>  [9] 100/1000 91/1000  83/1000

Mixed fractions

fracture((1:9) / 3, mixed = TRUE)
#> [1] 1/3   2/3   1     1 1/3 1 2/3 2     2 1/3 2 2/3 3

Convert decimals to a fraction matrix

For more advanced work, you may prefer to work with a fraction matrix:

frac_mat((1:11) / 12)
#>             [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10] [,11]
#> numerator      1    1    1    1    5    1    7    2    3     5    11
#> denominator   12    6    4    3   12    2   12    3    4     6    12

frac_mat() accepts all the same arguments as fracture().

When mixed fractions are used, frac_mat() has three rows:

frac_mat((1:9) / 3, mixed = TRUE, common_denom = TRUE)
#>             [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9]
#> integer        0    0    1    1    1    2    2    2    3
#> numerator      1    2    0    1    2    0    1    2    0
#> denominator    3    3    3    3    3    3    3    3    3

Math with fractures

fractures are implemented using an S3 class. This means we can perform mathematical operations on them like real fractions.

fracture(0.25) * 2
#> [1] 1/2

fracture(0.25) + fracture(1/6)
#> [1] 5/12

Stylish fractures

frac_style() uses Unicode to provide stylish formatting for inline fractions.

`r frac_style(pi, mixed = TRUE, max_denom = 500)`

3 ¹⁶/₁₁₃

Just a fun example

Use fracture to find the best approximations of π for each maximum denominator.

unique(purrr::map_chr(1:50000, ~ fracture(pi, max_denom = .x)))
#> [1] "3/1"          "22/7"         "333/106"      "355/113"      "103993/33102"
#> [6] "104348/33215"

Isn’t is interesting that there’s such a wide gap between ³⁵⁵/₁₁₃ and ¹⁰³⁹⁹³/₃₃₁₀₂?

Advantages 🚀

fracture is implemented using optimized C++ with Rcpp and S3 methods. This allows it to run faster than alternatives like MASS::fractions() or fractional::fractional().*

# Performance with a single value
single_benchmark
#> # A tibble: 3 x 6
#>   expression                            min median `itr/sec` mem_alloc `gc/sec`
#>   <bch:expr>                          <dbl>  <dbl>     <dbl>     <dbl>    <dbl>
#> 1 print(fracture(x[1]))                1      1         2.39       1       1.33
#> 2 print(MASS::fractions(x[1]))         2.14   2.47      1         26.4     1.98
#> 3 print(fractional::fractional(x[1]))  1.55   1.53      1.60      18.3     1

# Performance with a vector of length 1000
vector_benchmark
#> # A tibble: 3 x 6
#>   expression                         min median `itr/sec` mem_alloc `gc/sec`
#>   <bch:expr>                       <dbl>  <dbl>     <dbl>     <dbl>    <dbl>
#> 1 print(fracture(x))                1      1         1.78      1        1   
#> 2 print(MASS::fractions(x))         2.18   1.52      1.18      7.24     2.17
#> 3 print(fractional::fractional(x))  2.77   1.94      1         1.85     2.21

* fractional() does not compute a decimal’s fractional equivalent until it is printed. Therefore, benchmarking the time to print provides a fairer test of the three packages’ capabilities.

Hex sticker fonts are Source Code Pro by Adobe and Hasklig by Ian Tuomi.

Please note that fracture is released with a Contributor Code of Conduct. By contributing to this project, you agree to abide by its terms.



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fracture documentation built on Sept. 8, 2020, 5:06 p.m.