This Vignette will show an example of the function analyseMagentic()

Prepare the data

At first we need some librarys to handle the spatial data

library(rgdal)
library(raster)
devtools::load_all() #< In you case library(aRchgeomag)

The data you need for analysing it are:

magnetik_disp <- magnetik
magnetik_disp[magnetik_disp > 4] <- 4
magnetik_disp[magnetik_disp < -4] <- -4
plot(magnetik_disp)
plot(magnetik_disp)
points(anomalien, pch = 21, bg = "red", col="black")

Identify the dipoles

For identifing the dipole a few parameters have to be set:

get_dipol <- TRUE -- We want to export the dipoles

angle_steps <- The script will generate profiles throught the anomaly. These profiles will be generate in steps of angle_stepsĀ° (>0 && < 180), as more profiles are used, as more detailed the resolution is, but as longer the calculation takes

searchradius <- the distance from the point in the anomalie that is under observation K dipolfactor <- 1. way to define a dipole: The dipole is defined by |minimal value in the profiles * dipolfactor| > maximal value in the profile

dipol_minima <- Additional way to define a dipole. In some cases it is usefull to define a lower border of nT. All anomalies that have values lower this border are defied as dipoles

tip: Open your data in GIS (e.g. QGIS) and draw a profile (e.g. Terrain profile) through your anomalies and dipoles to understand your data

Now we can calculate the dipoles

anomalies_export <- analyseMagnetic(anomalies_sdf = anomalien, magnetic_raster=magnetik, get_dipol = TRUE, angle_steps = 10 , searchradius = 2.5,dipolfactor = 2,dipol_minima = -8)
plot(magnetik_disp)
points(anomalies_export[anomalies_export@data$di_kB == 2,], pch = 21, bg = "black", col="black")
points(anomalies_export[anomalies_export@data$di_kB == 1,], pch = 21, bg = "red", col="black")
points(anomalies_export[anomalies_export@data$di_kB == 0,], pch = 21, bg = "green", col="black")

All red dots are marked as dipoles. As you can see there are two anomalies next to each other marked. The negative area of one anomaly can influence another one, if it is in the same searchradius. Therefore it is important to validate the data after this step

Anomalies marked with 0 (green) are potential anicient

Anomalies marked with 2 (black) are under the dipole minima. In this case the black anomalie would be red, if the dipole_minima is to low

Getting the values of the profiles

To do statistical similarity tests it is necessary to analyse the amplitudes of the anomalies and get the values of width and heigth

Therefore we can use other parameters

get_profile_values <- TRUE -- We want to export the values

angle_steps The script will generate profiles throught the anomalie. These profiles will be generate in steps of angle_stepsĀ° (>0 && < 180), as more profiles are used, as more detailed the resolution is, but as longer the calculation takes

searchradius the distance from the point in the anomalie that is under observation

cut_value To compare the data we need a similar base for every amplitude. If we have an aplitude the function will return the width of the amplitude at the level of cut_value nT. Like in the first step, it is advisable to take a look at your data in GIS first

method For every anomalie there will be a few profiles based on angle_steps. There are two methods to get the width values of the amplitude of the profile. "avg": There average width of all profiles or "median": the median width of all profiles.

anomalies_compare <- anomalies_export[anomalies_export@data$di_kB == 0,]
anomalies_result <- analyseMagnetic(anomalies_sdf = anomalies_compare, magnetic_raster=magnetik, get_profile_values = TRUE, angle_steps = 10, searchradius = 2.5, cut_value = 5, method = "avg")

There result is a SpatialDataFrame containing the width and heigth of each anomaly

anomalies_result@data

Now you can compare your anomalies e.g. with a cluster analysis and group them to find similar geomagnetic features



ISAAKiel/aRchaeomag documentation built on June 12, 2017, 2:49 a.m.