Dot plot: scatter plot with stacked dots similar to the stem-and-leaf plot

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Description

Displays an one-dimensional scatter plot with stacking similar to stem-and-leaf plot or histograms.

Usage

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dotPlot(x, y = 0, xlim = range(x,na.rm=TRUE), xlab = NULL, 
    scatter = FALSE, hmax = 1, base = TRUE, axes = TRUE, frame = FALSE, 
    pch = 21, pch.size = "x", labels = NULL, hcex = 1, cex =par("cex"), 
    cex.axis = par("cex.axis"),...)

Arguments

x

numeric vector to be displayed.

y

numeric. Height of the basis of the plot.

xlim

numeric. Range of the x axis.

xlab

character string. label for the horizontal axis.

scatter

logical. If TRUE a one-dimensional scatter plot of x, similar to rug, is displayed at the base of the plot.

hmax

numeric. Height of the highest dot. hmax=1 as default. See Details.

base

logical. If TRUE (default) a base line for the dots (characters) is displayed.

axes

logical. If TRUE labelled axis is displayed.

frame

logical. If FALSE the plot frame is omitted.

pch

numeric or character. Character number or character to be used for the display.

pch.size

numeric. Character to be used to distribute the "dots" (pch). See Details.

labels

character vector. If NULL (default) each point (dot) is displayed using character pch, otherwise vector labels is used for the display. See Details.

hcex

numeric. Expansion (shrink) factor for character height. See Details.

cex

numeric. Expansion factor used for character display. See par.

cex.axis

numeric. Expansion factor used in case of labelling the axis.

...

additional graphical parameters.

Details

Basically function dotPlot calls function dots to display a stacked one-dimensional scatter plot within vertical limits 0 and 1. See dots for more details.

Value

The function is called for its side effect which is to produce one-dimensional scatter plot with stacking as described, for example, in Chambers et al. (1983) It returns invisible a data frame with the actual coordinates (in users units).

Note

Since the dots are stacked vertically, their alignment is subject to rounding errors. Dots may be slightly moved in either side from their actual value.

Author(s)

Ernesto Barrios

References

Chambers, J. M., Cleveland, W. S., Kleiner, B. and Tukey, P. A. (1983) Graphical Methods for Data Analysis. New York: Chapman \& Hall

See Also

dots, stem,hist,dotchart

Examples

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library(BHH2)
data(tab03B1)
attach(tab03B1)
stem(yield) #stem-leaf plot
plt <- dotPlot(yield) # equivalent dotPlot

# same dot plot with max and min observations labelled
plt <- dotPlot(yield,xlim=c(75,95),xlab="yield",pch.size="x",hcex=1)
text(c(min(yield),max(yield),80),rep(0.05,3),c("min","max",80))
segments(80,min(plt$y),80,max(plt$y),lty=2)
detach()