PET: Potential evapotranspiration models

Description Usage Arguments Value References Examples

View source: R/RcppExports.R

Description

Calculate your potential evapotranspiration series. This module was design to provide a simple and straight forward way to calculate one of the inputs for the soil routine (to show how does it works), but for real world application I strongly recommend the use of the specialized Evapotranspiration package.

Usage

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PET(
  model,
  hemis,
  inputData,
  elev,
  param
  )

Arguments

model

numeric value with model option:

  • 1: Calder's model.

hemis

numeric value indicating the hemisphere:

  • 1: southern hemisphere.

  • 2: northern hemisphere.

inputData

numeric matrix with the following columns:

Calder's model

  • column_1: julian dates, e.g: as.matrix( c(1:365) ).

elev

numeric vector with the following values:

Calder's model

  • 1: zref: the reference height where potential evapotranspiration or input data to calculate PET is known.

  • 2: ztopo: target PET's topographic height.

param

numeric vector with the following values:

Calder's model

  • 1: PET: climatological daily mean potential evapotranspiration [mm].

  • 2: gradPET: evapotranspiration decrease gradient [mm/100 m].

Value

Numeric vector with the potential evapotranspiration series.

References

Calder, I.R., Harding, R.J., Rosier, P.T.W., 1983. An objective assessment of soil-moisture deficit models. J. Hydrol. 60, 329–355. https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-1694(83)90030-6

Examples

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# The following is a toy example. I strongly recommend to see
# the package vignettes in order to improve your skills on HBV.IANIGLA

## Run the model for a year in the southern hemisphere
potEvap <- PET(model = 1,
               hemis = 1,
               inputData = as.matrix(1:365),
               elev = c(1000, 1500),
               param = c(4, 0.5))

HBV.IANIGLA documentation built on Jan. 23, 2021, 1:07 a.m.