Simulating Tracks

Introduction

Simulating artifical tracks using mathematical or statistical models can help interpret the data from a tracking experiment. This tutorial will explain how to use simulation methods provided with the package. The simulation methods provided in the package are:

Datasets

First load the package:

library( celltrackR )
library( ggplot2 )
# Save current par() settings
oldpar <- par( no.readonly =TRUE )

The package contains a dataset of T cells imaged in a mouse peripheral lymph node using two photon microscopy. We will here use this dataset as an example of how we can compare real tracking data with data from a simulation model.

The dataset consists of 21 tracks of individual cells in a tracks object:

str( TCells, list.len = 3 )

Each element in this list is a track from a single cell, consisting of a matrix with $(x,y,z)$ coordinates and the corresponding measurement timepoints:

head( TCells[[1]] )

1 Modelling brownian motion

1.1 A simple random walk

We can use the function brownianTrack() to simulate a simple random walk (here in 3 dimensions):

brownian <- brownianTrack( nsteps = 20, dim = 3 )
str(brownian)

Note that this returns a single track matrix, which we can turn into a track object by using wrapTrack():

plot( wrapTrack(brownian) )

We can also simulate multiple tracks at once using the simulateTracks() function. Do this and compare to the T cell tracks:

brownian.tracks <- simulateTracks( 10, brownianTrack( nsteps = 20, dim = 3 ) )
par(mfrow=c(1,2))
plot( brownian.tracks, main = "simulated random walk" )
plot( normalizeTracks( TCells ), main = "real T cell data" )

1.2 Matching displacement to data

In this simulation, the displacement vector for each step is sampled randomly in each dimension from a normal distribution of $\mu=0, \sigma=1$. To match the average displacement observed in the T cell data:

# get displacement vectors
step.displacements <- t( sapply( subtracks(TCells,1), displacementVector ) )

# get mean and sd of displacement in each dimension
step.means <- apply( step.displacements, 2, mean )
step.sd <- apply( step.displacements, 2, sd )

# simulate brownian motion with the same statistics
brownian.tracks.matched <- simulateTracks( 10, brownianTrack( nsteps = 20, dim = 3,
                                                              mean = step.means,
                                                              sd = step.sd ) )

# compare displacement distributions
data.displacement <- sapply( subtracks( TCells,1), displacement )
matched.displacement <- sapply( subtracks( brownian.tracks.matched, 1 ), displacement )

df <- data.frame( disp = data.displacement,
                  data = "TCells" )
df2 <- data.frame( disp = matched.displacement,
                   data = "model" )
df <- rbind( df, df2 )
ggplot( df, aes( x = data, y = disp ) ) +
  geom_boxplot() +
  theme_classic()

# Plot new simulation versus real data
par(mfrow=c(1,2))
plot( brownian.tracks.matched, main = "simulated random walk" )
plot( normalizeTracks( TCells ), main = "real T cell data" )

1.3 A biased random walk

We can bias movement in a certain direction by setting the mean in each dimension:

# simulate brownian motion with bias
brownian.tracks.bias <- simulateTracks( 10, brownianTrack( nsteps = 20, dim = 3,
                                                              mean = c(1,1,1) ) )

plot( brownian.tracks.bias, main = "biased random walk" )

2 The Beauchemin model of lymphocyte migration

Aside from a simple random walk, the package also implements a slightly different model proposed by Beauchemin et al (2007). In contrast to the simple random walk, this model has a tuneable amount of persistence, and the cell pauses briefly between each step as it needs to reorient itself, which takes some time. For these reasons, the Beauchemin model generates tracks that are a bit more realistic than a simple random walk.

beauchemin.tracks <- simulateTracks( 10, beaucheminTrack(sim.time=20) )
plot( beauchemin.tracks )

See ?beaucheminTrack for further details.

3 Bootstrapping method for simulating migration

The final simulation method provided in the package is bootstrapTrack(), which does not assume an underlying migration model but samples speeds and turning angles from a real dataset.

For example, we can do this for the T cell data:

bootstrap.tracks <- simulateTracks( 10, bootstrapTrack( nsteps = 20, TCells ) )
plot( bootstrap.tracks )

If all is as should be, the distribution of speed and turning angles should now match the real data closely. Check this:

# Simulate more tracks to reduce noice
bootstrap.tracks <- simulateTracks( 100, bootstrapTrack( nsteps = 20, TCells ) )

# Compare step speeds in real data to those in bootstrap data
real.speeds <- sapply( subtracks( TCells,1 ), speed )
bootstrap.speeds <- sapply( subtracks( bootstrap.tracks,1), speed )
dspeed <- data.frame( tracks = c( rep( "data", length( real.speeds ) ),
                                  rep( "bootstrap", length( bootstrap.speeds ) ) ),
                      speed = c( real.speeds, bootstrap.speeds ) )

# Same for turning angles
real.angles <- sapply( subtracks( TCells,2 ), overallAngle, degrees = TRUE )
bootstrap.angles <- sapply( subtracks( bootstrap.tracks,2), overallAngle, degrees = TRUE )
dangle <- data.frame( tracks = c( rep( "data", length( real.angles ) ),
                                  rep( "bootstrap", length( bootstrap.angles ) ) ),
                      angle = c( real.angles, bootstrap.angles ) )

# plot
pspeed <- ggplot( dspeed, aes( x = tracks, y = speed ) ) +
  geom_violin( color = NA, fill = "gray" ) +
  geom_boxplot( width = 0.3 ) +
  theme_classic()

pangle <- ggplot( dangle, aes( x = tracks, y = angle ) ) +
  geom_violin( color = NA, fill = "gray" ) +
  geom_boxplot( width = 0.3 ) +
  theme_classic()

gridExtra::grid.arrange( pspeed, pangle, ncol = 2 )

4 Example: Comparing data with models

4.1 Mean square displacement plot

To compare two different models with the real T cell data, we make a mean square displacement plot. To remove the effect of noise, we simulate a greater number of tracks than before:

# Simulate more tracks
brownian.tracks <- simulateTracks( 100, brownianTrack( nsteps = 20, dim = 3,
                                                              mean = step.means,
                                                              sd = step.sd ) )
bootstrap.tracks <- simulateTracks( 100, bootstrapTrack( nsteps = 20, TCells ) )

msd.data <- aggregate( TCells, squareDisplacement, FUN = "mean.se" )
msd.data$data <- "data"
msd.brownian <- aggregate( brownian.tracks, squareDisplacement, FUN = "mean.se" )
msd.brownian$data <- "brownian"
msd.bootstrap <- aggregate( bootstrap.tracks, squareDisplacement, FUN = "mean.se" )
msd.bootstrap$data <-"bootstrap"

msd <- rbind( msd.data, msd.brownian, msd.bootstrap )
ggplot( msd, aes( x = i, y = mean, ymin = lower, ymax = upper, color = data, fill = data ) ) +
  geom_ribbon( color= NA, alpha  = 0.2 ) +
  geom_line() +
  labs( x = "t (steps)",
        y = "square displacement" ) +
  scale_x_continuous(limits= c(0,20) ) +
  theme_bw()

Both the random walk model and the bootstrapped tracks underestimate the MSD as observed in real data - even though the bootstrapped data at least matches speed and turning angle distributions well.

This suggests there is more directional persistence in the real data than those models assume. In the next section, we will check this by making the autocorrelation plot.

4.2 Persistence: autocovariance plot

To check for directional persistence, we generate an autocovariance plot:

# compute autocorrelation
acor.data <- aggregate( TCells, overallDot, FUN = "mean.se" )
acor.data$data <- "data"
acor.brownian <- aggregate( brownian.tracks, overallDot, FUN = "mean.se" )
acor.brownian$data <- "brownian"
acor.bootstrap <- aggregate( bootstrap.tracks, overallDot, FUN = "mean.se" )
acor.bootstrap$data <-"bootstrap"

acor <- rbind( acor.data, acor.brownian, acor.bootstrap )
ggplot( acor, aes( x = i, y = mean, ymin = lower, ymax = upper, color = data, fill = data ) ) +
  geom_ribbon( color= NA, alpha  = 0.2 ) +
  geom_line() +
  labs( x = "dt (steps)",
        y = "autocovariance" ) +
  scale_x_continuous(limits= c(0,20) ) +
  theme_bw()

Indeed, the autocovariance drops less steeply for the real T cell data, which indicates that there is a directional persistence in the T cell data that is not captured by the brownian and bootstrapping models. Thus, even when a model captures some aspects of the walk statistics in the data, it may still behave differently in other respects.

# Reset par() settings
par(oldpar)


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celltrackR documentation built on April 14, 2020, 6:42 p.m.