sanger.read.spikes: Read in a nexTimestamps file from Neuroexplorer and create a...

Description Usage Arguments Details Value Author(s) See Also Examples

View source: R/sanger.R

Description

The Genes to Cognition Project (G2C) uses Neuroexplorer to output spike times from an MEA recording. This function reads those text files and creates a "spikes" data structure.

Usage

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sanger.read.spikes(filename, ids=NULL, time.interval=1,
                   beg=NULL, end=NULL, min.rate=0)

Arguments

filename

Name of the text file to be read in.

ids

Which electrodes should be kept.

time.interval

How often to estimate the firing rate.

beg

Start time of the recording.

end

End time of the recording.

min.rate

Minimum firing rate of an electrode.

Details

This format is fairly simple; each column represents one channel, with the spikes recorded in that channel filling up the column. Since different channels are likely to record different numbers of spikes, empty values (just a TAB to next value) are found at the bottom of each spike train.

Text files can be compressed, using gzip, to save space. (The extension .gz is added to compresed files.) This compression aspect should be transparent to the end user – if a file is compresed, the filename can be given with or without the .gz extension. gzip is available for Windows (from http://www.gzip.org); "gzip *.nexTimestamps" will compress all timestamps, and "gzip -d *.nexTimestamps" will uncompress them.

Value

Return the data structure 's'.

Author(s)

Stephen Eglen

See Also

jay.read.spikes compute.ns

Examples

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data.file <- system.file("examples", "TC89_DIV15_A.nexTimestamps",
                         package = "sjemea")
s <- sanger.read.spikes( data.file, beg=400, end=700)
fourplot(s)

sjemea documentation built on May 31, 2017, 3:45 a.m.