R/Lsys.R

Defines functions Lsys

Documented in Lsys

##' Rewrite an Axiom Using Production Rules to Give a String Ready for Turtle Graphics
##'
##' This is the central function for rewriting an initial string of symbols (the axiom)
##' into a new string using production rules.  Production rules are very simple: if
##' the symbol is A, turn it into something.  If it is B, turn it into something else.
##' Production rules typically contain instructions about moving while drawing,
##' moving w/o drawing, changing direction, or storing the current state for re-use later.
##'
##' The job of this function is to take an input "axiom" and apply the "production
##' rules" and other paramters to create a new string of drawing instructions.  The
##' "language" or character set of the axiom and production rules are arbitary, and
##' the internet and literature contains many different examples.  The same fractal
##' could be drawn using completely different sets of symbols.  The string produced
##' by this function is processed by \code{\link{drawLsys}}.  See there for further
##' explanation and examples.
##'
##' @param init A character string giving variables (symbols) to use as the initial string
##' Also known as the axiom.
##'
##' @param rules A data frame containing columns "inp" and "out".  These contain the input
##' variables and the corresponding replacement string.  See the examples in
##' \code{\link{drawLsys}}.
##'
##' @param n An integer giving the number of cycles or iterations desired.
##'
##' @param retAll Logical.  If \code{TRUE}, the result at each cycle will be returned,
##' otherwise only the last result is returned.
##'
##' @param verbose An integer giving the level of information desired as the calculation
##' proceeds.  \code{verbose = 1L} gives basic information at each cycle.
##' Any value greater than 1 gives much more detail.  Supress messages by using a value
##' less than 1.
##'
##' @return If \code{retAll = FALSE}, a character vector of length 1 giving the string
##' at the end processing.  Otherwise, a character vector of length \code{n + 1}
##' containing \code{init} plus the results at the end of each iteration.
##' 
##' @name Lsys
##' @rdname Lsys
##' @export
##' @keywords utilities
##'
##' @seealso \code{\link{drawLsys}} for examples, including plotting.
##'

Lsys <- function(init = NULL, rules = NULL, n = 5,
	retAll = TRUE, verbose = 1L) {

	nc <- nchar(rules$inp)
	if (any(nc > 1)) stop("Input variables must be a single character")
	
	if (verbose == 1L) cat("\nCycle 0 string has length ", nchar(init), "\n", sep = "")
	if (verbose == 1L) cat("Cycle 0:", init, "\n")
	curr <- init
	out <- rep(NA_character_, n+1) # save init and all output
	out[1] <- init
	
	for (j in 1:n) {
		# apply all the rules simultaneously to the current string
		# this is different than any built-in string processing
		# I can find in R
		
		RR <- vector("list") # save the rule output here
		for (i in 1:nrow(rules)) {
			rr <- str_locate_all(curr, rules[i,1])
			if (verbose > 1L) cat("Processing rule", i, "\n")
			if (dim(rr[[1]])[1] == 0) {
				if (verbose > 1L) cat("\tRule", i, "was not needed\n")
				next
				}		
			RR[i] <- rr
			}
			
		# reformat RR into something more useful
		print(RR)
		
		
		for (i in 1:length(RR)) {
			tmp <- as.data.frame(RR[i])
			# if (is.na(tmp[1,1])) {
				
				# next # empty output as rule didn't apply
				# }
			tmp$insert <- rules[i,2]
			RR[[i]] <- tmp
			}

		print(RR)
		
		# RR is still a list, unlist to a data frame
		
		RRdf <- as.data.frame(RR[1])
		for (i in 2:length(RR)) {
			RRdf <- rbind(RRdf, as.data.frame(RR[i]))
			}
			
		if (verbose > 1L) print(RRdf)
		
		# assemble a new string using the rules
		
		curr <- unlist(strsplit(curr, ""))
		curr[RRdf$start] <- RRdf$insert
		curr <- paste0(curr, collapse = "")
		out[j+1] <- curr
		if (verbose == 1L) cat("\nCycle ", j, " string has length ", nchar(curr), "\n", sep = "")
		if (verbose == 1L) cat("Cycle ", j, ": ", curr, "\n", sep = "")
		}
		
	if (retAll) return(out)
	curr
	}
	
bryanhanson/LindenmayeR documentation built on Aug. 1, 2017, 8:10 a.m.