R/rlp.R

Defines functions residPlot.rlp fitPlot.rlp summary.rlp predict.rlp coef.rlp anova.rlp plot.rlp rlp

Documented in anova.rlp coef.rlp fitPlot.rlp plot.rlp predict.rlp residPlot.rlp rlp summary.rlp

#' @title Computes the standard weight equation using the regression-line-percentile method.
#' 
#' @description Computes the standard weight equation using the regression-line-percentile method when given the log(a) and b values for a population of length-weight regression equations.
#' 
#' @details The main function follows the steps of the regression-line-percentile method detailed in Murphy et al. (1990).  In summary, a predicted weight is constructed for each 1-cm length class from each population from the given \eqn{log_{10}(a)} and \eqn{b} values, the predicted weight at the \code{prob}th percentile (wq) is identified, and a linear regression equation is fit to the \eqn{log_{10}(wq)} and \eqn{log_{10}(midpoint length)} data.
#' 
#' Note that \eqn{log_{10}(a)} and \eqn{b} must be from the regression of \eqn{log_{10}(W)} on \eqn{log_{10}(L)} where W is measured in grams and L is the total length measured in mm.
#' 
#' It appears that Murphy et al. (1990) used \code{qtype=6} in their SAS program.  Types of quantile calculation methods are discussed in the details of of \code{quantile}.
#' 
#' The \code{plot}, \code{coef}, and \code{summary} methods are used to construct a plot (see below), extract the coefficients of the standard weight equation, and find summary results of the \code{lm} object returned by the main function.  The \code{what} argument in the \code{plot} method can be set to \code{"both"}, \code{"log"}, or \code{"raw"}.  The \code{"raw"} plot plots lines on the length-weight scale for each population represented in the \code{log.a} and \code{b} vectors with the resultant standard weight equation superimposed in red.  The \code{"log"} plot constructs a similar plot but on the \eqn{log_{10}(weight)}-\eqn{log_{10}(length)} scale.  The \code{"both"} option produces both plots side-by-side.
#' 
#' If the \code{col.pop} argument is set equal to one of these palettes -- \dQuote{rich}, \dQuote{cm}, \dQuote{default}, \dQuote{grey}, \dQuote{gray}, \dQuote{heat}, \dQuote{jet}, \dQuote{rainbow}, \dQuote{topo}, or \dQuote{terrain} -- and the \code{order.pop=TRUE} then the populations plotted should form a general color gradient from smallest to largest weight in the initial length category.  This will make it easier to identify populations that \dQuote{cross over} other populations.
#' 
#' @aliases rlp plot.rlp anova.rlp coef.rlp predict.rlp fitPlot.rlp residPlot.rlp summary.rlp
#' @param log.a A numeric vector that contains the \eqn{log_{10}(a)} values for the population of length-weight regression equations.
#' @param b A numeric vector that contains the b values for the population of length-weight regression equations
#' @param min A number that indicates the midpoint value of the smallest X-mm length category.
#' @param max A number that indicates the midpoint value of the largest X-mm length category.
#' @param w A number that indicates the widths for which to create length categories.
#' @param qtype Type of quantile method to use.  See details.
#' @param probs A number that indicates the probability of the quantile.  Must be between 0 and 1.
#' @param digits Number of digits to round predicted weights.
#' @param x An object saved from the \code{rlp} call (i.e., of class \code{rlp}).
#' @param object An object saved from \code{rlp()} or \code{emp()} (i.e., of class \code{rlp}) for the \code{anova}, \code{coef}, and \code{summary} functions..
#' @param what A string that indicates the type of plot to produce.  See details.
#' @param col.pop A string that indicates the type of color or palette to use for the population of length-weight regression lines.  See details.
#' @param order.pop A logical that indicates whether the populations should be plotted from the smallest to largest weight in the initial length category.  See details.
#' @param lwd.pop A numeric that indicates the width of the line to use for the population of length-weight regression lines.
#' @param lty.pop A numeric that indicates the type of line to use for the population of length-weight regression lines.
#' @param col.Ws A string that indicates the type of color to use for the standard length-weight regression line.
#' @param lwd.Ws A numeric that indicates the width of the line to use for the standard length-weight regression line.
#' @param lty.Ws A numeric that indicates the type of line to use for the standard length-weight regression line.
#' @param pch A single numeric that indicates what plotting characther codes should be used for the points in the fitPlot.
#' @param col.pt A string used to indicate the color of the plotted points.
#' @param xlab A label for the x-axis of fitPlot.
#' @param ylab A label for the y-axis of fitPlot.
#' @param main A label for the main title of fitPlot.
#' @param \dots Additional arguments for methods.
#' 
#' @return A list is returned with the following items:
#' \itemize{
#'   \item \code{log.a} is a numeric vector of the observed \eqn{log_{10}(a)} values sent in the \code{log.a} argument.
#'   \item \code{b} is a numeric vector of the observed \eqn{b} values sent in the \code{b} argument.
#'   \item \code{data.pred} is a matrix of the predicted weight at length for all populations.
#'   \item \code{data.reg} contains a data frame with the \code{prob}th quartile of predicted weights and the midpoint lengths.
#'   \item \code{Ws} is an \code{lm} object that contains the results of the regression of \eqn{log_{10}(wq)} on \eqn{log_{10}(midpoint length)}.
#' }
#' 
#' @author Derek H. Ogle, \email{[email protected]@northland.edu}
#' 
#' @seealso \code{\link{emp}}, \code{\link{FroeseWs}}, and \code{\link{wsValidate}}; and \code{quantile} in \pkg{stats}
#' 
#' @references Murphy, B.R., M.L. Brown, and T.A. Springer.  1990.  Evaluation of the relative weight (Wr) index, with new applications to walleye.  North American Journal of Fisheries Management, 10:85-97.
#' 
#' @keywords manip hplot
#' 
#' @examples
#' ## Recreate Murphy et al. (1990) results for largemouth bass
#' # min and max lengths were 152 and 816
#' # compare to log.a=-5.379 and b=3.221
#' data(LMBassWs)
#' lmb.rlp <- rlp(LMBassWs$log.a,LMBassWs$b,155,815,qtype=6)
#' coef(lmb.rlp)
#' plot(lmb.rlp)
#' #fitPlot(lmb.rlp)
#' #residPlot(lmb.rlp)
#' 
#' @rdname rlp
#' @export rlp
rlp <- function(log.a,b,min,max,w=10,qtype=8,probs=0.75,digits=NULL) {
  midpt <- seq(min,max,w)                                          # create length-class midpoints
  for (i in 1:length(log.a)) {                                     # predict weight at each 1-cm midpoint for each population
    w <- 10^(log.a[i]+b[i]*log10(midpt))
    if (!is.null(digits)) w <- round(w,digits)
    if (i==1) pred.w <- w                                          # store in a matrix called pred.w
    else pred.w <- cbind(pred.w,w)
  }
  colnames(pred.w) <- seq(1:dim(pred.w)[2])                        # rename columns to numbers that correspond to populations
  rownames(pred.w) <- midpt                                        # rename rows to correspond to midpt lengths
  wq <- apply(pred.w,MARGIN=1,FUN=quantile,probs=probs,type=qtype) # find qth percentile of predicted weights
  logwq <- log10(wq)
  logmidpt <- log10(midpt)
  Ws <- lm(logwq~logmidpt)                                 # regression of qth weights on lengths to get Ws equation                                         
  z <- list(log.a=log.a,b=b,data.pred=pred.w,regdata=data.frame(midpt=midpt,wq=wq,logmidpt=logmidpt,logwq=logwq),Ws=Ws,probs=probs)
  class(z) <- "rlp"
  z
}

#' @rdname rlp
#' @method plot rlp
#' @S3method plot rlp
plot.rlp <- function(x,what=c("both","raw","log"),
                     col.pop=c("rich","cm","default","grey","gray","heat","jet","rainbow","topp","terrain"),
                     lwd.pop=1,lty.pop=1,order.pop=TRUE,col.Ws="black",lwd.Ws=3,lty.Ws=1,...) {
  object <- x
  what <- match.arg(what)
  col.pop <- match.arg(col.pop)
  col.pop <- chooseColors(col.pop,length(object$b))
  ml <- object$regdata$midpt
  pw <- object$data.pred
  if (order.pop) pw <- pw[,order(pw[1,])]
  if (what=="both") old.par <- par(mar=c(3.5,3.5,1,1), mfcol=c(1,2), mgp=c(2,0.75,0))
    else old.par <- par(mar=c(3.5,3.5,1,1), mgp=c(2,0.75,0))
  on.exit(par(old.par))
  if (what=="raw" | what=="both") {
    matplot(ml,pw,type="l",lty=lty.pop,lwd=lwd.pop,col=col.pop,xlab="Length (mm)",ylab="Weight (g)")
    curve(10^coef(object$Ws)[1]*x^coef(object$Ws)[2],min(ml),max(ml),lty=lty.Ws,lwd=lwd.Ws,col=col.Ws,add=TRUE)
  }
  if (what=="log" | what=="both") {
    matplot(log10(ml),log10(pw),type="l",lty=lty.pop,lwd=lwd.pop,col=col.pop,xlab="log10(Length (mm))",ylab="log10(Weight (g))")
    abline(object$Ws,lty=lty.Ws,lwd=lwd.Ws,col=col.Ws)
  }
}

#' @rdname rlp
#' @method anova rlp
#' @S3method anova rlp
anova.rlp <- function(object,...) {
  anova(object$Ws,...)
}

#' @rdname rlp
#' @method coef rlp
#' @S3method coef rlp
coef.rlp <- function(object,...) {
  coef(object$Ws,...)
}

#' @rdname rlp
#' @method predict rlp
#' @S3method predict rlp
predict.rlp <- function(object,...) {
  predict(object$Ws,...)
}

#' @rdname rlp
#' @method summary rlp
#' @S3method summary rlp
summary.rlp <- function(object,...) {
  summary(object$Ws,...)
}

#' @rdname rlp
#' @method fitPlot rlp
#' @S3method fitPlot rlp
fitPlot.rlp <- function(object,pch=16,col.pt="black",col.Ws="red",lwd.Ws=3,lty.Ws=1,
        xlab="log10(midpt Length)",
        ylab=paste("log10(",100*object$prob," Percentile of Predicted Weight)",sep=""),
        main="RLP Equation Fit",...) {
  plot(object$regdata$logwq~object$regdata$logmidpt,pch=pch,col=col.pt,xlab=xlab,ylab=ylab,main=main,...)
  abline(object$Ws,col=col.Ws,lwd=lwd.Ws,lty=lty.Ws)
}

#' @rdname rlp
#' @method residPlot rlp
#' @S3method residPlot rlp
residPlot.rlp <- function(object,...) {
  residPlot(object$Ws)
} 
droglenc/FSAWs documentation built on July 8, 2018, 7:01 a.m.