PeriodicGeometry: Geometries to represent 2-d and 3-d spherical data.

Description Details Author(s) See Also Examples

Description

These models include a completely sphericial geometry based on a nearly regular node layout on the sphere. Also a simpler and perhaps more efficient versions are implemented where the first coordinate is periodic in the interval [0,360] and the remaining coordinates are regular (Euclidean). This might be used to approximate a section of spherical data that excludes the polar caps. These approximations are useful because one can take advantage of faster methods based on rectangular grids rather the more complex grids on a sphere. The disadvantage is that the mapping from these coordinates to the sphere is distorted as one gets close to the poles.

Details

These geometries are specified with the LKGeometry argument either in LKrigSetup or LatticeKrig. The first coordinate is longitude either from [0,360] or [-180,180] and the second is lattiude [-90, 90].

They each have the four specific methods: LKrigLatticeCenters, LKrigSAR, LKrigSetupLattice, setDefaultsLKinfo and the source code is consolidated in the source files ModelRing.R and ModelCylinder.R in the R subdirectory of this package source. For the spherical grid the a.wght is handled a but differently please read the note below.

LKSphere Recall that the core of the LatticeKrig model is the placement of the basis function centers and how the spatial autoregression is constructed from these node locations. Here the centers are generated according to a multiresolution based on the triangles from an Icsohedron. IcosohedronGrid creates a grid by taking the first level as the 12 points from a regular icsohedron. The subsequent levels generate a finer set of points by subdividing each triangular face into 4 new triangles. The three new mid points from the subdivision are added to the previous nodes to give the new level of resolution. The triangles tend to roughly equilateral and so the nodes will tend to be roughly equally spaced . NOTE: Because the distances between nodes are not perfectly equally spaced and nearest neighbors can be either 5 or 6 some adjustment is made to the weights when forming the SAR matrix. The net result is that it makes more sense to have the off diagonal rows sum to 1 and so the a.wght must be greater than 1.0 for a stationary model.

See the help file on link{IcosohedronFaces} for code on visualzing these. The first 12 centers will have 5 close neighbors and remaining centers will have 6. Currently the SAR weights are equal among all the neighbors and the a.wght parameter is adjusted by a.wght <- (a.wght - 6) + 5 for these locations. The basis functions have their default as using great circle distance to determine the values between the center and other points. Because the distances between centers are not equal some adjustment is made to the delta parameter for the basis function support. The NC parameter in this geometry is the beginning resolution level. Currently the number of basis functions in each level are

Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Number Basis functions 12 42 162 642 2562 10242 40962 163842

So if NC=2 and nlevel=3 there will be a total of 42 + 162 + 642 = 846 basis functions in the model.

LKRing This model follows the Mercator projection for a sphere where longitude and latitude are treated as Euclidean coordinates except that longitude is periodic. So the actual coordinates represent the surface of cylinder which is one way of visualizing the Mercator projection. To keep things simple the first coordinate is essentially hardwired to be in the scale of degrees (sorry for all you fans of radians) and wrapping 0 to 360 ( or periodic in [-180,180]). It is important to scale the second coordinate in this geometry to be comparable in spatial scale to degrees (use the V argument in LKrigSetup). However, if the second coordinate can be interpreted as a latitude it is often reasonable to assume the spatial scales are the same in these two coordinates.

Note this geometry can also be used to represent an equatorial section of a spherical volume. Here the first coordinate is longitude but the second can be interpreted as a radius from the sphere's center. This is a case where care needs to taken to scale the radial component to make sense with the degrees in the first.

LKCylinder This is just the three dimensional extension of LKRing with the first coordinate being periodic in (0,360) and the remaining two treated as Euclidean

The periodicity in the first coordinate is implemented in two places. First in setting up the spatial autoregression (SAR) weights, the weights reflect the wrapping. Second in finding distances between coordinates the nodes in the lattice has the first coordinate tagged as being periodic. Specifically in LKrigSetupLattice the gridList for each lattice has an attribute vector that indicates which coordinates are periodic. This information is used in the distance function LKrigDistance when called with arguments of a matrix and a gridList.

Why is this so complicated? This structure is designed around the fact that one can find the pairwise distance matrix quickly between an arbitrary set of locations and a rectangular grid (a gridList object in this package). The grid points within a delta radius of an arbitrary point can be found by simple arithmetic and indexing. Because these two geometries have regular lattice spacings is it useful to exploit this. See LKrigDistance for more details about the distance function.

Finally, we note that for just patches of the sphere one can use the usual LKRectangle geometry and change the distance function to either chordal or great circle distance. This gives a different approach to dealing with the inherent curvature but will be awkward as the domain is close to the poles.

Author(s)

Doug Nychka and Zachary Thomas

See Also

LatticeKrig, LKrigSetup, LKrigSAR, LKrigLatticeCenters

Examples

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# 	
# fit the CO2 satellite data with a fixed lambda
# (use a very small and unrealistic number of basis functions and levels so example
#  runs quickly)
 data(CO2)
# to look at raw data: quilt.plot(CO2$lon.lat, CO2$y, nx=288, ny=165)
  LKinfo0<- LKrigSetup( CO2$lon.lat, NC=1 ,nlevel=2,
                       a.wght=6.1, alpha=c(1, .25),
                       LKGeometry="LKSphere" )                                         
  # Use MLE for lambda found below 
  obj0<- LKrig( CO2$lon.lat,CO2$y,LKinfo=LKinfo0, lambda=0.01068)
  surface(obj0, nx=288, ny=165)
  world( add=TRUE)
## Not run: 
# estimate lambda ( should be 0.01068)
obj0B<-  LatticeKrig( CO2$lon.lat,CO2$y,LKinfo=LKinfo0)
# a more serious model this uses about 3300 basis functions
LKinfo0<- LKrigSetup( CO2$lon.lat, NC=3 ,nlevel=3,
                       a.wght=6.1, alpha=c(1, .5, .25),
                       LKGeometry="LKSphere" )
                       
obj0B<-  LatticeKrig( CO2$lon.lat,CO2$y,LKinfo=LKinfo0)
# takes about 1 minute on a macbook air
# setting findAwght = TRUE  takes about 8 minutes with 
# lambda = 1.737 and a.wght = 15.8 (independence among basis coefficients)

## End(Not run) 
# a more serious model 
## Not run: 
    
  LKinfo1<- LKrigSetup(CO2$lon.lat, NC=8 ,nlevel=1, lambda=.2,
                       a.wght=5, alpha=1, 
                       LKGeometry="LKRing" )                                         
  obj1<- LatticeKrig( CO2$lon.lat,CO2$y,LKinfo=LKinfo1)	
# take a look: 
surface( obj1)
world( add=TRUE) 

## End(Not run)
# compare to fitting without wrapping
#  LKinfo2<- LKrigSetup(CO2$lon.lat, NC=8 ,nlevel=1,
#                   lambda=.2, a.wght=5, alpha=1 )                                         
#  obj2<- LKrig( CO2$lon.lat,CO2$y,LKinfo=LKinfo2)	
# not periodic in longitude:
# surface(obj2)  

# a synthetic example and larger example
## Not run: 
 set.seed(124)
 N<- 1e4
 NC<- 3
  x0<- matrix( rnorm(3*N), ncol=3)
  x0<- x0/ sqrt( rowSums( x0^2))
  
  x<-  toSphere( x0 )
  
  # the true function for testing -- a bump at the direction alpha
  fun<- function(X){
    alpha<-  c( .4,.2,1)
    alpha<- alpha/ sqrt( sum( alpha^2))
    4*( 1 + c(( X)%*%alpha) )^2 
  }
  
  ytrue <- fun(x0)
  y<- ytrue + .05*rnorm( length(ytrue))
  xr=cbind( c(-180, 180), c(-90,90))
  # this defines about 3300 basis functions
  LKinfo1<- LKrigSetup( xr,
                        NC=NC, LKGeometry="LKSphere", a.wght=1.01,
                        nlevel=3, alpha = c(1.0,.5,.25)^2,
                        choleskyMemory=list(nnzR= 20E6),
                        normalize=FALSE)
  out<- LatticeKrig( x,y, LKinfo=LKinfo1)                      
surface( out)                        

## End(Not run)

LatticeKrig documentation built on May 23, 2017, 9:06 a.m.

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