eliminate: Eliminate a variable from a set of edit rules

Description Usage Arguments Value References See Also Examples

View source: R/eliminate.R

Description

Eliminating a variable amounts to deriving all (non-redundant) edits not containing that variable. Geometrically, it can be seen as a projection of the solution space (records obeying all edits) along the eliminated variable's axis. If the solution space is non-concex (as is the usually case when conditional edits are involved), multiple projections of convex subregions are performed.

For objects of class editmatrix, Fourier-Motzkin elimination is used to eliminate a variable from the of linear (in)equality restrictions. An observation of Kohler (1967) is used to reduce the number of implied restrictions. Obvious redundancies of the type 0 < 1 are removed as well.

For categorical edits in an editarray, the elimination method is based on repeated logical reduction on categories. See Van der Loo (2012) for a description.

For an editset, E is transformed to an editlist. Each element of an editlist describes a convex subregion of the total solution space of the editset. After this, the elimination method for editlist is called.

For an editlist, the variable is eliminated from each consituting editset.

Usage

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eliminate(E, var, ...)

## S3 method for class 'editmatrix'
eliminate(E, var, ...)

## S3 method for class 'editarray'
eliminate(E, var, ...)

## S3 method for class 'editset'
eliminate(E, var, ...)

## S3 method for class 'editlist'
eliminate(E, var, ...)

Arguments

E

editmatrix or editarray

var

name of variable to be eliminated

...

argumemts to be passed to or from other methods

Value

If E is an editmatrix or editarray, an object of the same class is returned. A returned editmatrix contains an extra history attribute which is used to reduce the number of generated edits in consecutive eliminations (see getH). If E is an editset, an object of class editlist is returned.

References

D.A. Kohler (1967) Projections of convex polyhedral sets, Operational Research Center Report , ORC 67-29, University of California, Berkely.

H.P. Williams (1986) Fourier's method of linear programming and its dual, The American Mathematical Monthly 93, 681-695

M.P.J. van der Loo (2012) Variable elimination and edit generation with a flavour of semigroup algebra (submitted).

See Also

substValue, isObviouslyInfeasible, isObviouslyRedundant, generateEdits

Examples

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# The following is an example by Williams (1986). Eliminating all variables
# except z maximizes -4x1 + 5x2 +3x3:
P <- editmatrix(c(
     "4*x1 - 5*x2 - 3*x3 + z <= 0",
     "-x1 + x2 -x3 <= 2",
     "x1 + x2 + 2*x3 <= 3",
     "-x1 <= 0",
     "-x2 <= 0",
     "-x3 <= 0"))
# eliminate 1st variable
(P1 <- eliminate(P, "x1", fancynames=TRUE))
# eliminate 2nd variable. Note that redundant rows have been eliminated
(P2 <- eliminate(P1, "x2", fancynames=TRUE))
# finally, the answer:
(P3 <- eliminate(P2, "x3", fancynames=TRUE))

# check which original edits were used in deriving the new ones
getH(P3)

# check how many variables were eliminated
geth(P3)


# An  example with an equality and two inequalities
# The only thing to do is solving for x in e1 and substitute in e3.
(E <- editmatrix(c(
    "2*x + y == 1",
    "y > 0",
    "x > 0"),normalize=TRUE))
eliminate(E,"x", fancynames=TRUE)


# This example has two equalities, and it's solution 
# is the origin (x,y)=(0,0)
(E <- editmatrix(c(
    "y <= 1 - x",
    "y >= -1 + x",
    "x == y",
    "y ==-2*x" ),normalize=TRUE))
eliminate(E,"x", fancynames=TRUE)

# this example has no solution, the equalities demand (x,y) = (0,2)
# while the inequalities demand y <= 1
(E <- editmatrix(c(
    "y <= 1 - x",
    "y >= -1 + x",
    "y == 2 - x",
    "y == -2 + x" ),normalize=TRUE))
# this happens to result in an obviously unfeasable system:
isObviouslyInfeasible(eliminate(E,"x"))


# for categorical data, elimination amounts to logical derivartions. For
# example
E <- editarray(expression(
    age %in% c('under aged','adult'),
    positionInHousehold %in% c('marriage partner', 'child', 'other'),
    maritalStatus %in% c('unmarried','married','widowed','divorced'),
    if (maritalStatus %in% c('married','widowed','divorced') ) 
        positionInHousehold != 'child',
    if (maritalStatus == 'unmarried') 
        positionInHousehold != 'marriage partner' ,
    if ( age == 'under aged') maritalStatus == 'unmarried'
    )
)
E

# by eliminating 'maritalStatus' we can deduce that under aged persones cannot
# be partner in marriage.
eliminate(E,"maritalStatus")

E <- editarray(expression(
    age %in% c('under aged','adult'),
    positionInHousehold %in% c('marriage partner', 'child', 'other'),
    maritalStatus %in% c('unmarried','married','widowed','divorced'),
    if (maritalStatus %in% c('married','widowed','divorced') ) 
        positionInHousehold != 'child',
    if (maritalStatus == 'unmarried') 
        positionInHousehold != 'marriage partner' ,
    if ( age == 'under aged') 
        maritalStatus == 'unmarried'
    )
)
E

# by eliminating 'maritalStatus' we can deduce that under aged persones cannot
# be partner in marriage.
eliminate(E,"maritalStatus")

editrules documentation built on July 2, 2018, 1 a.m.