bundestag: German Parliament Election Data

Description Usage Arguments Format Details German Federal Elections References Examples

View source: R/bundestag.R

Description

Results of the elections 2002, 2005 or 2009 for the German Bundestag, the first chamber of the German parliament.

Usage

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data(btw2002)
data(btw2005)
data(btw2009)
bundestag(year, second=TRUE, percent=TRUE, nazero=TRUE, state=FALSE)

Arguments

year

Numeric or character, year of the election.

second

Logical, return second or first votes?

percent

Logical, return percentages or absolute numbers?

nazero

Logical, convert NAs to 0?

state

Logical or character. If TRUE then only column state from the corresponding data frame is returned, and all other arguments are ignored. If character, then it is used as pattern to grep for the corresponding state(s), see examples.

Format

btw200x are data frames with 299 rows (corresponding to constituencies) and 17 columns. All columns except state are numeric.

state

Factor, the 16 German federal states.

eligible

Number of citizens eligible to vote.

votes

Number of eligible citizens who did vote.

invalid1, invalid2

Number of invalid first and second votes (see details below).

valid1, valid2

Number of valid first and second votes.

SPD1, SPD2

Number of first and second votes for the Social Democrats.

UNION1, UNION2

Number of first and second votes for CDU/CSU, the conservative Christian Democrats.

GRUENE1, GRUENE2

Number of first and second votes for the Green Party.

FDP1, FDP2

Number of first and second votes for the Liberal Party.

LINKE1, LINKE2

Number of first and second votes for the Left Party (PDS in 2002).

Missing values indicate that a party did not candidate in the corresponding constituency.

Details

btw200x are the original data sets. bundestag() is a helper function which extracts first or second votes, calculates percentages (number of votes for a party divided by number of valid votes), replaces missing values by zero, and converts the result from a data frame to a matrix. By default it returns the percentage of second votes for each party, which determines the number of seats each party gets in parliament.

German Federal Elections

Half of the Members of the German Bundestag are elected directly from Germany's 299 constituencies, the other half on the parties' state lists. Accordingly, each voter has two votes in the elections to the German Bundestag. The first vote, allowing voters to elect their local representatives to the Bundestag, decides which candidates are sent to Parliament from the constituencies.

The second vote is cast for a party list. And it is this second vote that determines the relative strengths of the parties represented in the Bundestag. At least 598 Members of the German Bundestag are elected in this way. In addition to this, there are certain circumstances in which some candidates win what are known as “overhang mandates” when the seats are being distributed.

References

Homepage of the Bundestag: http://www.bundestag.de

Examples

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p02 <- bundestag(2002)
pairs(p02)
p05 <- bundestag(2005)
pairs(p05)
p09 <- bundestag(2009)
pairs(p09)

state <- bundestag(2002, state=TRUE)
table(state)

start.with.b <- bundestag(2002, state="^B")
table(start.with.b)

pairs(p09, col=2-(state=="Bayern"))

flexclust documentation built on May 2, 2019, 10:59 a.m.