Lung cancer mortality data for white females, 2000-4 and 1995-9

Description

Counts and rates of age-adjusted (2000 U.S. standard) lung cancer mortality data among white women, aggregated for 1995-9 and 2000-4.

Usage

1

Format

A data frame with 51 observations, 1 for each state + DC, on the following 12 variables.

Rate.00

a numeric vector of age-adjusted rates by state during 2000-4 for white females

Count.00

a numeric vector of the number of white female lung cancer deaths during 2000-4

Lower.00

a numeric vector of the 95% confidence interval lower bound for white female 2000-4 rates

Upper.00

a numeric vector of the 95% confidence interval upper bound for white female 2000-4 rates

Pop.00

a numeric vector of the white female population during 2000

StdErr.00

a numeric vector of the standard error of the white female 2000-4 rates

Rate.95

a numeric vector of age-adjusted rates by state during 1995-9 for white females

Count.95

a numeric vector of the number of white female lung cancer deaths during 1995-9

Lower.95

a numeric vector of the 95% confidence interval lower bound for white female 1995-9 rates

Upper.95

a numeric vector of the 95% confidence interval upper bound for white female 1995-9 rates

Pop.95

a numeric vector of the white female population estimates for 1995

StdErr.95

a numeric vector of the standard error of the white female 1995-9 rates

Details

The rates on this file are directly age adjusted to the US 2000 standard population and are expressed as the number of deaths per 100,000 person-years. The row names are the 2 character postal codes for the states. The data represents the rates for two periods of time: 2000 to 2004 and 1995 to 1999. This dataset is used in the micromapST examples.

Author(s)

Linda W. Pickle and Jim Pearson of StatNet Consulting, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD

Source

Surveillance Research Program, National Cancer Institute SEER*Stat software (http://www.seer.cancer.gov/seerstat), November 2007 data submission, released April 2008. Data originally provided to NCI by the National Center for Health Statistics.