survfitJM: Prediction in Joint Models

Description Usage Arguments Details Value Author(s) References See Also Examples

View source: R/survfitJM.R

Description

This function computes the conditional probability of surviving later times than the last observed time for which a longitudinal measurement was available.

Usage

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survfitJM(object, newdata, ...)

## S3 method for class 'JMbayes'
survfitJM(object, newdata, 
   type = c("SurvProb", "Density"), idVar = "id", 
   simulate = TRUE, survTimes = NULL, last.time = NULL, 
   LeftTrunc_var = NULL, M = 200L, 
   CI.levels = c(0.025, 0.975), log = FALSE, scale = 1.6, 
   weight = rep(1, nrow(newdata)), 
   init.b = NULL, seed = 1L, ...)

## S3 method for class 'mvJMbayes'
survfitJM(object, newdata, 
    survTimes = NULL, idVar = "id", last.time = NULL, 
    M = 200L, scale = 1.6, log = FALSE, 
    CI.levels = c(0.025, 0.975), seed = 1L, ...)

Arguments

object

an object inheriting from class JMBayes or mvJMBayes.

newdata

a data frame that contains the longitudinal and covariate information for the subjects for which prediction of survival probabilities is required. The names of the variables in this data frame must be the same as in the data frames that were used to fit the linear mixed effects model (using lme()) and the survival model (using coxph()) that were supplied as the two first argument of jointModelBayes. In addition, this data frame should contain a variable that identifies the different subjects (see also argument idVar).

type

character string indicating what to compute, i.e., survival probabilities or the log conditional density.

idVar

the name of the variable in newdata that identifies the different subjects.

simulate

logical; if TRUE, a Monte Carlo approach is used to estimate survival probabilities. If FALSE, a first order estimator is used instead. (see Details)

survTimes

a numeric vector of times for which prediction survival probabilities are to be computed.

last.time

a numeric vector or character string. This specifies the known time at which each of the subjects in newdata was known to be alive. If NULL, then this is automatically taken as the last time each subject provided a longitudinal measurement. If a numeric vector, then it is assumed to contain this last time point for each subject. If a character string, then it should be a variable in the data frame newdata.

LeftTrunc_var

character string indicating the name of the variable in newdata that denotes the left-truncation time.

M

integer denoting how many Monte Carlo samples to use – see Details.

CI.levels

a numeric vector of length two that specifies which quantiles to use for the calculation of confidence interval for the predicted probabilities – see Details.

log

logical, should results be returned in the log scale.

scale

a numeric scalar that controls the acceptance rate of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm – see Details.

weight

a numeric vector of weights to be applied to the predictions of each subject.

init.b

a numeric matrix of initial values for the random effects. These are used in the optimization procedure that finds the mode of the posterior distribution described in Step 2 below.

seed

numeric scalar, the random seed used to produce the results.

...

additional arguments; currently none is used.

Details

Based on a fitted joint model (represented by object), and a history of longitudinal responses tilde{y_i}(t) = {y_i(s), 0 ≤q s ≤q t} and a covariates vector x_i (stored in newdata), this function provides estimates of Pr(T_i > u | T_i > t, tilde{y}_i(t), x_i), i.e., the conditional probability of surviving time u given that subject i, with covariate information x_i, has survived up to time t and has provided longitudinal the measurements tilde{y}_i(t).

To estimate Pr(T_i > u | T_i > t, tilde{y}_i(t), x_i) and if simulate = TRUE, a Monte Carlo procedure is followed with the following steps:

Step 1:

Take randomly a realization, say θ^* from the MCMC sample of posterior of the joint model represented by object.

Step 2:

Simulate random effects values, say b_i^*, from their posterior distribution given survival up to time t, the vector of longitudinal responses \tilde{y}_i(t) and θ^*. This is achieved using a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with independent proposals from a properly centered and scaled multivariate t distribution. The scale argument controls the acceptance rate for this algorithm.

Step 3

Using θ^* and b_i^*, compute Pr(T_i > u | T_i > t, b_i^*, x_i; θ^*).

Step 4:

Repeat Steps 1-3 M times.

Based on the M estimates of the conditional probabilities, we compute useful summary statistics, such as their mean, median, and percentiles (to produce a confidence interval).

If simulate = FALSE, then survival probabilities are estimated using the formula

Pr(T_i > u | T_i > t, hat{b}_i, x_i; hat{θ}),

where \hat{θ} denotes the posterior means for the parameters, and \hat{b}_i denotes the posterior means for the random effects.

Value

A list of class survfit.JMbayes with components:

summaries

a list with elements numeric matrices with numeric summaries of the predicted probabilities for each subject.

survTimes

a copy of the survTimes argument.

last.time

a numeric vector with the time of the last available longitudinal measurement of each subject.

obs.times

a list with elements numeric vectors denoting the timings of the longitudinal measurements for each subject.

y

a list with elements numeric vectors denoting the longitudinal responses for each subject.

full.results

a list with elements numeric matrices with predicted probabilities for each subject in each replication of the Monte Carlo scheme described above.

success.rate

a numeric vector with the success rates of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm described above for each subject.

scale

a copy of the scale argument.

Author(s)

Dimitris Rizopoulos [email protected]

References

Rizopoulos, D. (2016). The R package JMbayes for fitting joint models for longitudinal and time-to-event data using MCMC. Journal of Statistical Software 72(7), 1–45. doi:10.18637/jss.v072.i07.

Rizopoulos, D. (2012) Joint Models for Longitudinal and Time-to-Event Data: with Applications in R. Boca Raton: Chapman and Hall/CRC.

Rizopoulos, D. (2011). Dynamic predictions and prospective accuracy in joint models for longitudinal and time-to-event data. Biometrics 67, 819–829.

See Also

plot.survfit.JMbayes, predict.JMbayes, aucJM, dynCJM, prederrJM, jointModelBayes

Examples

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## Not run: 
# we construct the composite event indicator (transplantation or death)
pbc2$status2 <- as.numeric(pbc2$status != "alive")
pbc2.id$status2 <- as.numeric(pbc2.id$status != "alive")

# we fit the joint model using splines for the subject-specific 
# longitudinal trajectories and a spline-approximated baseline
# risk function
lmeFit <- lme(log(serBilir) ~ ns(year, 2), data = pbc2,
    random = ~ ns(year, 2) | id)
survFit <- coxph(Surv(years, status2) ~ drug, data = pbc2.id, x = TRUE)
jointFit <- jointModelBayes(lmeFit, survFit, timeVar = "year")

# we will compute survival probabilities for Subject 2 in a dynamic manner, 
# i.e., after each longitudinal measurement is recorded
ND <- pbc2[pbc2$id == 2, ] # the data of Subject 2
survPreds <- vector("list", nrow(ND))
for (i in 1:nrow(ND)) {
    survPreds[[i]] <- survfitJM(jointFit, newdata = ND[1:i, ])
}
survPreds

###########################################################################

# Predictions from multivariate models

pbc2 <- pbc2[!is.na(pbc2$serChol), ]
pbc2.id <- pbc2[!duplicated(pbc2$id), ]
pbc2.id$Time <- pbc2.id$years
pbc2.id$event <- as.numeric(pbc2.id$status != "alive")

# Fit a trivariate joint model
MixedModelFit <- mvglmer(list(log(serBilir) ~ year + (year | id),
                              sqrt(serChol) ~ year + (year | id),
                              hepatomegaly ~ year + (year | id)), data = pbc2,
                         families = list(gaussian, gaussian, binomial), engine = "STAN")

CoxFit <- coxph(Surv(Time, event) ~ drug + age, data = pbc2.id, model = TRUE)

JMFit <- mvJointModelBayes(MixedModelFit, CoxFit, timeVar = "year")

# We want survival probabilities for three subjects
ND <- pbc2[pbc2$id %in% c(2, 25, 81), ]

sprobs <- survfitJM(JMFit, ND)
sprobs

# Basic plot
plot(sprobs)

# split in a 2 rows 2 columns and include the survival function in 
# a separate panel; plot only the third & first subjects; change various defaults
plot(sprobs, split = c(3, 2), surv_in_all = FALSE, which_subjects = c(3, 1),
     lty_lines_CI = 3, col_lines = "blue", col_fill_CI = "red", 
     col_points = "pink", pch_points = 12)

###########################################################################

# run Shiny app
runDynPred()

## End(Not run)

JMbayes documentation built on Nov. 17, 2017, 5:20 a.m.