Dactyl: Edgeworth's counts of dactyls in Virgil's Aeneid

Description Usage Format Source References Examples

Description

Edgeworth (1885) took the first 75 lines in Book XI of Virgil's Aeneid and classified each of the first four "feet" of the line as a dactyl (one long syllable followed by two short ones) or not.

Grouping the lines in blocks of five gave a 4 x 25 table of counts, represented here as a data frame with ordered factors, Foot and Lines. Edgeworth used this table in what was among the first examples of analysis of variance applied to a two-way classification.

Usage

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Format

A data frame with 60 observations on the following 3 variables.

Foot

an ordered factor with levels 1 < 2 < 3 < 4

Lines

an ordered factor with levels 1:5 < 6:10 < 11:15 < 16:20 < 21:25 < 26:30 < 31:35 < 36:40 < 41:45 < 46:50 < 51:55 < 56:60 < 61:65 < 66:70 < 71:75

count

number of dactyls

Source

Stigler, S. (1999) Statistics on the Table Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, table 5.1.

References

Edgeworth, F. Y. (1885). On methods of ascertaining variations in the rate of births, deaths and marriages. Journal of the [Royal] Statistical Society, 48, 628-649.

Examples

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data(Dactyl)

# display the basic table
xtabs(count ~ Foot+Lines, data=Dactyl)

# simple two-way anova
anova(dact.lm <- lm(count ~ Foot+Lines, data=Dactyl))

# plot the lm-quartet
op <- par(mfrow=c(2,2))
plot(dact.lm)
par(op)

# show table as a simple mosaicplot
mosaicplot(xtabs(count ~ Foot+Lines, data=Dactyl), shade=TRUE)

HistData documentation built on May 21, 2017, 1:04 a.m.

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