refinedBoundary: Summarize Primary and Refined Secondary Boundaries, Nominal...

Description Usage Arguments Details Value Author(s) References Examples

View source: R/refinedBoundaries.R

Description

Primary boundaries, refined secondary boundaries, and nominal significance for the secondary endpoint are listed.

Usage

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refinedBoundary(alpha, tVec, pOBF = TRUE, sOBF = FALSE, LanDeMets = FALSE,
  SpeedQuality = "fast", digits = 2)

Arguments

alpha

type I error probability.

tVec

vector of relative information levels. The last element in the vector is 1.

pOBF

type of primary boundary, TURE is the O'Brien-Fleming boundary, FALSE is the Pocock boundary.

sOBF

type of secondary boundary, TURE is the O'Brien-Fleming boundary, FALSE is the Pocock boundary.

LanDeMets

type of boundary, TRUE is the error spending approach, FALSE is the original approach.

SpeedQuality

quality-speed tradeoff parameter. Choices are fastest, fast, acceptable, normal, good, and stable.

digits

number of digits after decimal point for primary and secondary boundaries.

Details

This function gives a list including primary boundary, refined secondary boundary, and the nominal significance for the secondary endpoint. When the choice of parameter SpeedQuality is fastest, fast, acceptable, or normal, the default number of digits for boundaries is 2. When the choice of parameter SpeedQuality is good or stable, the default number of digits for boundaries is 2. The number of digits for boundaries after decimal point can also be specified through parameter digits. The number of digits for the nominal significance depends on parameter alpha.

Value

a result list including primary boundary, refined secondary boundary, and the nominal significance for the secondary endpoint.

Author(s)

Jiangtao Gou

References

Glimm, E., Maurer, W., and Bretz, F. (2010). Hierarchical testing of multiple endpoints in group-sequential trials. Statistics in Medicine 29, 219-228.

Hung, H. M. J., Wang, S.-J., and O'Neill, R. (2007). Statistical considerations for testing multiple endpoints in group sequential or adaptive clinical trials. Journal of Biopharmaceutical Statistics 17, 1201-1210.

Jennison, C. and Turnbull, B. W. (2000). Group Sequential Methods with Applications to Clinical Trials. Chapman and Hall/CRC, New York.

Lan, K. K. G., and Demets, D. L. (1983). Discrete sequential boundaries for clinical trials. Biometrika 70, 659-663.

O'Brien, P. C., and Fleming, T. R. (1979). A multiple testing procedure for clinical trials. Biometrics 35, 549-556.

Pocock, S. J. (1977). Group sequential methods in the design and analysis of clinical trials. Biometrika 64, 191-199.

Tamhane, A. C., Mehta, C. R., and Liu, L. (2010). Testing a primary and a secondary endpoint in a group sequential design. Biometrics 66, 1174-1184.

Tamhane, A. C., Gou, J., Jennison, C., Mehta, C. R., and Curto, T. (2017+). A gatekeeping procedure to test a primary and a secondary endpoint in a group sequential design with multiple interim looks. Biometrics, to appear.

Examples

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require(mvtnorm)
require(ldbounds)
result <- refinedBoundary(alpha=0.05,tVec=c(0.2,0.6,1),SpeedQuality="fastest")
result$primaryBoundary
result$secondaryBoundary
result$nomialSignificance

gsrsb documentation built on May 29, 2017, 7:12 p.m.