dplyr-verbs: Use dplyr verbs with huxtable objects

Description Usage Arguments Details Examples

Description

Huxtable can be used with dplyr verbs dplyr::select(), dplyr::rename(), dplyr::relocate(), dplyr::slice(), dplyr::arrange(), dplyr::mutate() and dplyr::transmute(). These will return huxtables. Other verbs like dplyr::summarise() will simply return data frames as normal; dplyr::pull() will return a vector. mutate has an extra option, detailed below.

Usage

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mutate.huxtable(.data, ..., copy_cell_props = TRUE)

Arguments

.data

A huxtable.

...

Arguments passed to dplyr::mutate().

copy_cell_props

Logical: copy cell and column properties from existing columns.

Details

If mutate creates new columns, and the argument copy_cell_props is missing or TRUE, then cell and column properties will be copied from existing columns to their left, if there are any. Otherwise, they will be the standard defaults. Row and table properties, and properties of cells in existing columns, remain unchanged.

Examples

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ht <- hux(a = 1:5, b = 1:5, c = 1:5, d = 1:5, add_colnames = FALSE)
bold(ht)[c(1, 3), ] <- TRUE
bold(ht)[, 1] <- TRUE
ht2 <- dplyr::select(ht, b:c)
ht2
bold(ht2)
ht3 <- dplyr::mutate(ht, x = a + b)
ht3
bold(ht3)
ht4 <- dplyr::mutate(ht, x = a + b,
      copy_cell_props = FALSE)
bold(ht4)

huxtable documentation built on May 15, 2021, 1:09 a.m.